3 ISSUES FOR JUST £3 Subscribe to Hampshire Life today click here

Get planting this Centenary

PUBLISHED: 11:23 17 September 2014 | UPDATED: 11:35 17 September 2014

© John Sambrooks

© John Sambrooks

Archant

The Royal British Legion is calling on the public to plant a living legacy for those who fought and died in the First World War as part of its Centenary commemorations.

Working in partnership with Ashridge Nurseries on a project called Centenary Gardens, the Legion aims to keep the memory of those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the First World War alive for future generations. The Centenary Gardens project will allow people to go online and choose from a selection of over 100 trees, shrubs or roses and plant them in their garden or somewhere special to them, their family or community to create a living memory. A minimum of 50% of profits will go directly to the Legion, which is the National Custodian of Remembrance, to support its work as the nation’s leading armed forces charity providing care and support to all members of the British Armed Forces past and present, and their families.

Gardeners of all varieties, no matter what space they may have available, will be able to place orders, handled through Ashridge, at www.centenarygardens.co.uk over the next four years throughout the commemorations of WWI. Dr. Stephen Clarke, Head of Remembrance at the Legion says: “The idea of planting a living legacy in commemoration of those who died in the First World War brings to life the notion of passing on the torch of Remembrance to the next generation. Living tributes of this nature can last for decades if not hundreds of years, standing as a lasting reminder of sacrifices that have been made on our behalf.”

--------------------------------------------------

Arthur Turner Apple Bush (from £20.00)

Raised in 1912, Arthur Turner was named in memory of the breeder’s son who died in the field in Flanders in 1915. It is one of the best early cooking apples, a popular garden variety, suitable for the north and wet areas. It is an early cropping bush and so the fruit does not store well, but ripening happens over a period of several weeks meaning they can be picked fresh over an extended period.

Tips for planting: Smaller trees such as Arthur Turner need a planting hole about 80-100cms square and about 30cms deep. Remove all weeds, roots, stones and other rubbish and mix a bucket of well-rotted compost with the soil from the hole before planting. Bang the stake into the ground, the windward side of the tree (usually South West) before planting. Plant the tree at the level it was growing before, return the soil, firm well and water very thoroughly.

--------------------------------------------------

Remembrance Rose (from £6.50)

The Remembrance Rose is used to commemorate loved ones, symbolising loyalty enduring beyond all else. The appearance of the Red Remembrance rose is similar to the poppy which is commonly used as the lasting symbol of remembrance and peace, adopted by the Royal British legion in 1921.

Tips for planting: Roses are best planted where there is plenty of light, they love sunshine and at least want high light levels. You can grow climbing roses through a shady area though so they can get to the sun, for example - up and over a shady wall or through a tree. Ideally your roses should get at least half a day of sun in the summer to perform at their best.

----------------------------------

Oak Tree (from £32.00)

The decision to plant an oak, with a life expectancy of 500+ years is an appropriate choice to create a living memorial, allowing us to never forget the sacrifices made by the British on the battlefields of Europe.

Tips for planting: Be sure to destroy all weeds and remove the grass in a metre wide square / circle around the base of the tree. If you are planting in the middle of a lawn, you can clear a smaller area. Prepare the soil well in advance of planting by digging the soil over to remove stones etc and adding in some well rotted manure / compost. All establishing trees must be watered during dry weather for at least one year after you plant them. During winter, the rain will normally take care of this for you.

----------------------------------

Peace Rose (from £6.00)

Elegantly hued, the ‘Peace rose’ is a perfect choice of plant in terms of vigour, hardiness, and the long lasting ability of its bloom. Its dependability makes it the perfect flower to create a lasting memory.

Tips for planting: Roses like a moisture retentive soil, but drainage should be good. Masses of well-rotted organic matter is the answer as it improves soil quality and enriches at the same time. When preparing a rose bed, it is well worth while covering it in a layer 3-4” deep of well-rotted compost or horse manure and digging it over thoroughly to the depth of a spade. Your roses will be there and flowering beautifully for the next 20-30 years and this initial preparation will pay huge dividends all through their lives.

More from Out & About

Head to the Isle of Wight to enjoy the charming villages of Brighstone and Mottistone, taking in superb views, an ancient monument and enchanting gardens with our new walks writer, Fiona Barltrop

Read more
12:29

With the centenary of the end of World War One commemorated this year, the reopening of the iconic Royal Victoria Chapel, part of our military heritage, is timely

Read more
Friday, September 21, 2018

10 of best photos of Hampshire shared on Instagram over the past week...

Read more
Tuesday, September 18, 2018

This year Winchester’s Theatre Royal celebrates the 40th anniversary of its re-opening as a performance theatre

Read more
Monday, September 17, 2018

Avon Valley, Beer and Cake is the ABC of why Ringwood, a busy market town on the western edge of the New Forest, makes a quirkily clever choice for a break away

Read more
Monday, September 10, 2018

Lego enthusiast Duncan Titmarsh has built his business brick by brick; from tinkering in his garden shed to internationally acclaimed sculptures

Read more
Monday, September 10, 2018

New Forest ponies are an iconic sight, yet modern-day pressures pose a constant threat to the traditional landscape. Viv Micklefield heads to Lyndhurst to take stock of what happens inside England’s oldest forest court

Read more
Tuesday, August 28, 2018

From Austen’s treasures to castles built by Henry VIII, Heritage Open Days (6-9 and 13-16 September 2018) allow you to step behind the doors of some of the county’s most iconic but hidden premises.

Read more
Tuesday, August 28, 2018

With the New Forest, South Downs and a picturesque coastline, Hampshire is an amazing place for a walk. We round up a few of our favourites

Read more
Tuesday, August 28, 2018

We round up some of the best events and things to do across Hampshire this month

Read more
Tuesday, August 28, 2018

If there’s one thing we love to do here at Hampshire Life, it’s to celebrate local produce! So here are a selection of some of the best farm shops across the county where you’ll find just that

Read more
Tuesday, August 28, 2018

With a vibrant local community, this is a shining example of a true Hampshire village

Read more
Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Coeliac disease affects 1 in 100 people, and many more are seeing the health benefits after waving goodbye to gluten. Here are just a few of the county’s cafes, pubs and producers who are embracing the gluten free way

Read more
Monday, August 20, 2018

Looking for some peace and tranquility this summer? Lose yourself in one of these wonderful gardens

Read more
 
A+ South & South West

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy


Latest Competitions & Offers

Topics of Interest

Food and Drink Directory

Subscribe or buy a mag today


subscription ad

Local Business Directory



Property Search