How to create ‘Japandi’ style in your home: an interior designer’s guide

PUBLISHED: 14:50 28 September 2020

Embrace simplicity in interior design. Picture: martingardner.com

Embrace simplicity in interior design. Picture: martingardner.com

Archant

This year is fueling a growing trend for nature-inspired design; earthy paint colours, natural materials and fibres and homewares made by skilled craftsmen are all gaining increasing popularity.

Use pared-back furniture and fitted joinery in natural textures and neutral tones to help guide the eye around the room. Picture: martingardner.comUse pared-back furniture and fitted joinery in natural textures and neutral tones to help guide the eye around the room. Picture: martingardner.com

Emma Hooton, owner of Winchester-based interior design firm Studio Hooton, explains how this is being reflected within the home and how you can achieve the latest ‘Japandi’ style.

What is Japandi style?

Interior styles that reflect our wish to return to a simpler, nature-inspired world, such as Scandinavian and Japanese design, has given rise to a new design style: Japandi.

It draws on the notion of ‘wabi-sabi’ - finding beauty in the imperfect - and ‘hygge’ the Scandinavian style trend which signifies comfort and warmth. Both styles focus on similar design principles, helping you bring simplicity and functionality to your home.

Painting a room with shades of paint in the same colour family helps to create a subtle, immersive look. Picture: martingardner.comPainting a room with shades of paint in the same colour family helps to create a subtle, immersive look. Picture: martingardner.com

How can I introduce the Japandi look to my home?

There are three key design elements to the Japandi style; clean lines, neutral tones and natural textures.

Japandi interior design principle 1: clean lines

Using strong, clean lines in a room can create a calm, uncluttered feel, ideal for unwinding after a stressful day.

This year is fueling a growing trend for nature-inspired design. Picture: martingardner.comThis year is fueling a growing trend for nature-inspired design. Picture: martingardner.com

To help the eye glide effortlessly around the room, go for pared-back furniture and fitted joinery in natural textures and neutral tones. If you live in an active household, ‘faux’ the minimalism by using baskets or folding screens – I love Japanese style ones - to keep the space clean and clutter-free. Be selective with your objects, by only incorporating keepsakes you truly love.

Top tip: objects with patina or ageing, such as a bowl or mirror, can add beauty and bring character to an interior.

There are three key design elements to the Japandi style; clean lines, neutral tones and natural textures. Picture: martingardner.comThere are three key design elements to the Japandi style; clean lines, neutral tones and natural textures. Picture: martingardner.com

Japandi interior design principle 2: neutral tones

Cold greys are out and being replaced by warmer, earthy tones.

Colours in natural tones have a back to basics honesty perfect for creating a cosy sanctuary in the bedroom or living room.

Painting a room with shades of paint in the same colour family also helps to create a subtle, immersive look. A studio favourite is Little Greene’s ‘Slaked Lime’ which comes in four tones: light, mid, deep and dark. These can be used interchangeably on walls, joinery and woodwork to create interest, depth and space.

Top tip: paint out the ceilings in the same colour as the walls, and avoid reverting to white!

Japandi interior design principle 3: natural textures

Furniture, objects and surface coverings such as wallpaper made from natural fibres are all the rage right now.

Rattan bed frames, sisal rugs, wicker chairs and neutral tone papers made from straw, bark or grasscloth are also a luxurious way to add texture and warmth that don’t have to be reserved for walls.

A heavy grasscloth such as Phillip Jeffries ‘Raffia Retreat’ creates a bold statement full of natural charm at the back of joinery where there are shelves. Natural wood and stone such as marble look great in the bathroom too.

Top tip: combine textured wallpaper with curtains in a heavy weight, loose weave linen in muted shades for a seriously stylish look.

If you’re looking for a more Zen-inspired interior, Studio Hooton offers a consultation service, in addition to their main interior design services.

Contact Peggy at studio@studiohooton.com to find out more or visit studiohooton.com.

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