Top Hampshire wildlife photography on Instagram

PUBLISHED: 00:00 17 July 2020 | UPDATED: 10:04 17 July 2020

Damsels and Dragons - For myself, lockdown has given me more time to reconnect with the wildlife on my doorstep. During this time, it also feels like mother nature has breathed a sigh of relief. Wildflowers have flourished, creating a rich and beautiful source of nectar and habitat for pollinating insects such as moths, butterflies and bees. Dragonflies and damselflies seem to have increased in numbers and diversity in a way Id not seen in previous years, which in turn has gradually encouraged birds and the more timid mammals out into the open. Living in Basingstoke Ive been lucky enough to never be too far away from nature, something Ive always had a childlike passion for and fortunately all Ive needed is time, a camera and a bit of luck to enjoy it.  Gary Laundy, @GaryLaundy

Damsels and Dragons - For myself, lockdown has given me more time to reconnect with the wildlife on my doorstep. During this time, it also feels like mother nature has breathed a sigh of relief. Wildflowers have flourished, creating a rich and beautiful source of nectar and habitat for pollinating insects such as moths, butterflies and bees. Dragonflies and damselflies seem to have increased in numbers and diversity in a way Id not seen in previous years, which in turn has gradually encouraged birds and the more timid mammals out into the open. Living in Basingstoke Ive been lucky enough to never be too far away from nature, something Ive always had a childlike passion for and fortunately all Ive needed is time, a camera and a bit of luck to enjoy it. Gary Laundy, @GaryLaundy

Archant

This month our instagram @hampshirelifemagazine has been full of the wonderful wildlife that has made our dear county their home during lockdown. Here are just a few of our favourites .

Nectar collector

“Walking around the grounds of Chawton House it feels like a dream. Normally busy with activity but at the moment it is waiting in silent anticipation for the return of visitors. In the garden you can lose yourself in the vibrant colours of the flowers and the fabulous smell of the roses, but during lockdown I have been able to focus on animals and insects that have become our visitors. The birds seem louder, squirrels, rabbits and deer seem to be braver, and the bumblebees have come out in abundance.”

Claire Lewis, Chawton, clairelewisphotography.co.uk, @clairelewisphotographymua

Pure shores

“Upon my daily walk during the lockdown period, nature and wildlife seem to be a lot more active. Less people outside is showing just how beautiful Southsea, and other areas, can be, especially at sunset. The clearer waters are bringing in more aquatic wildlife and nature onto the shores of Southsea, creating mesmerising colours under the golden sunsets. Low tides in the evening are beautiful because of how far you can walk out and unearth some parts of the seafront you’ve never seen before. With limited people patrolling the area, wildlife and nature are immediately become something so peaceful and incredible to witness.”

Lewis Jefferies, Southsea @lewiisjefferies

A day on the beach

“A city dweller, I am often mesmerised by the scenes one so often observes in the countryside, and this spring has made the experience even more acute. We came across this wild beach on a whim whilst driving home from Beaulieu, and I thought the cows happily taking in the seaside was a majestic sight, especially as humankind is going through such high levels of anxiety and stress.”

Maria Ivy @blogthehungrylens

Peek-a-boo

“This photo was taken at The Peoples Memorial at Langstone Harbour in Portsmouth. I hadn’t come across the memorial until lockdown and my sister recommended the location as something different for a daily walk. One feature of the memorial is the white doves living in birdhouses overlooking it. I managed to capture this photo of them popping their head out of their home to see who was visiting. I imagine they hadn’t received many visitors over the last few weeks! During lockdown it was lovely to see animals undisturbed, able to enjoy their natural habitats. I particularly enjoyed seeing images of animals on social media moving into urban spaces in the absence of man.”

Rhiannon Sievwright, Portsmouth, photogenicpompey.com @photogenicpompey

Tag us in your photographs from arund Hampshire at @hampshirelifemagazine

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Latest from the Hampshire