CHRISTMAS OFFER Subscribe for £25 today CLICK HERE

The draw of Liphook

PUBLISHED: 12:14 11 February 2010 | UPDATED: 16:18 20 February 2013

Liphook's pretty square features a plethora of 17th century properties

Liphook's pretty square features a plethora of 17th century properties

Just what was it that drew Nelson and author Flora Thompson to the village of Liphook?

Liphook is a large village on the Surrey and West Sussex borders which grew as a coaching stop between London and Portsmouth during the 17th and 18th centuries. Its Square features attractive 17th century properties; one of them, The Royal Anchor, has a fireback dated 1588.
Liphook is surrounded by an unspoilt landscape of heather-covered commons and deep wooded valleys.
During World War 1 Canadian soldiers were stationed here and there are graves to 350 Canadian soldiers at St Mary's, Bramshott, who died during a flu epidemic in 1917.


Most noted for... golf courses.


While you're here... Take an autumnal stroll around Waggoner's Wells created in 1615 to supply Henry Hooke's iron foundry; it's now a National Trust beauty spot.


But try not to... miss the monthly local producers' market in the village hall.


Move here for...
945,000
And get:
A Grade II listed country house created from converting two hop kilns and part of a large barn, with six bedrooms, galleried sitting room and over two acres of grounds.


Eat at: The Links
Why? Lots of local produce in a menu of traditional and contemporary
pub favourites.


Drink at: The Deer's Hut,
Griggs Green
Why? 17th century hunting lodge in a tranquil spot with seats in the sun on the lawn.
Stay at: The Old Thorns Manor Hotel, Griggs Green


Why? Originally a 17th century farmhouse, now a country house hotel with health spa and championship golf course designed by Peter Allis.


Who's who
Tradition has it that Nelson spent his last night in Liphook before sailing for the Battle of Trafalgar.
The poet Tennyson lived at Grayshott Hall and wrote his ode Flower in the Crannied Wall on one of his walks through Waggoner's Wells.
Author Flora Thompson (Lark Rise, Over to Candleford, Candleford Green) lived in Liphook where her husband was postmaster and wrote her first work Bog Myrtle and Peat here. Her notes on the local wildlife were recorded in The Peverel Papers and her life in the area was remembered in a collection of essays, Heatherley.


Razzle Dazzle them
Hollycombe Steam Collection is the largest traditional fairground in Britain with Edwardian steam fairground, Haunted Cottage, Gallopers and the Razzle Dazzle, considered the original white knuckle ride.


Fall back...
On the night that the clocks go back, the village plays host to the Liphook Carnival with floats and bonfire - following a tradition that's taken place since 1903.


Above par
Liphook Golf Course features the burial mound of a Saxon chieftain between the 14th tee and 11th green.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Hampshire